Abdullah Al-hrbi.

My name's Abdullah I'm 21 years old I'm from Maddinah I love fishing and football welcome to my post and I hope you engoy with it PIN:2B7EB9C4

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canadiansoccergirl:

elemeno-pee:

flowury:

evillisa:

digitintheremisterspock:

thoughtsupnorth:

reaill:

nyoommm

this penguin makes me feel better

nyoommm

I like penguin.

NYOOOM

it’s actions say NYOOM but its face says it dont give a fuck

Nyoooooom

canadiansoccergirl:

elemeno-pee:

flowury:

evillisa:

digitintheremisterspock:

thoughtsupnorth:

reaill:

nyoommm

this penguin makes me feel better

nyoommm

I like penguin.

NYOOOM

it’s actions say NYOOM but its face says it dont give a fuck

Nyoooooom

(Source: gifdrome)

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(Source: ghada-alabdullah)

sundxwn:

Amazing Rio by Juan Carlos Ruiz

sundxwn:

Amazing Rio by Juan Carlos Ruiz

(Source: classoverswaglife)

(Source: wanglet.com)

(Source: ambermozo)

(Source: Flickr / jdbfhr)

(Source: careywhat)

(Source: pink-liquid)

rhamphotheca:

WORK IN CURRENT HERPETOLOGY:
Some Seemingly Harmless Snakes Possess a Secret Venom Gland
by Rachel Nuwer
Usually, we think of snakes as falling into one of two groups—venomous and nonvenomous. But to the surprise of herpetologists, a new group has emerged, which seems to fall into a previously unknown grey area between venomous and not.
This discovery occurred after victims who received bites from “harmless” snakes—Thrasops flavigularis in Africa and green whip snakes in Europe—began showing suspect symptoms, including problems with neuromotor skills. Upon closer examination, herpetologists noticed that both of those culprit species possess something called the Duvernoy’s gland.
Researchers have long puzzled over what this gland’s purpose is; some think it’s used for helping the snakes swallow and digest food, while others believe it’s a primitive version of what scientists consider true venom glands. With these latest findings, however, herpetologists writing in the journal Toxin propose classifying it as a true venom gland…
(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)

photograph: Green Whip Snake (Hierophis viridiflavus), by Jean-Jacques Milan

rhamphotheca:

WORK IN CURRENT HERPETOLOGY:

Some Seemingly Harmless Snakes Possess a Secret Venom Gland

by Rachel Nuwer

Usually, we think of snakes as falling into one of two groups—venomous and nonvenomous. But to the surprise of herpetologists, a new group has emerged, which seems to fall into a previously unknown grey area between venomous and not.

This discovery occurred after victims who received bites from “harmless” snakes—Thrasops flavigularis in Africa and green whip snakes in Europe—began showing suspect symptoms, including problems with neuromotor skills. Upon closer examination, herpetologists noticed that both of those culprit species possess something called the Duvernoy’s gland.

Researchers have long puzzled over what this gland’s purpose is; some think it’s used for helping the snakes swallow and digest food, while others believe it’s a primitive version of what scientists consider true venom glands. With these latest findings, however, herpetologists writing in the journal Toxin propose classifying it as a true venom gland…

(read more: Smithsonian Magazine)
photograph: Green Whip Snake (Hierophis viridiflavus), by Jean-Jacques Milan
llbwwb:


Acrobatic Baby Elephant by Josef Gelernter

llbwwb:

Acrobatic Baby Elephant by Josef Gelernter

insensatuss:

"ارجع إليَّ،، فإن الأرض واقفةٌ… كأنما الأرض قد فَرَّت من ثوانيها" - نزار قباني

insensatuss:

"ارجع إليَّ،، فإن الأرض واقفةٌ… كأنما الأرض قد فَرَّت من ثوانيها" - نزار قباني

(Source: weheartit.com)